Saturday, September 4, 2010

A Useful Caution on Genetics

SPIEGEL: Why is it taking so long for the results of genome research to be applied in medicine?

Venter: Because we have, in truth, learned nothing from the genome other than probabilities. How does a 1 or 3 percent increased risk for something translate into the clinic? It is useless information.

SPIEGEL: Do you think there will be a time when you can extract all this information to yield real medical results?

Venter: For that to happen we need a lot more information: Information about your body’s chemistry, your physiology, your complete medical history, your brain and your entire life. We would need to do that a million times on different people and correlate that data with their genetic information.

SPIEGEL: Will that lead in the end to the kind of personalized medicine that genetic researchers have always touted? Each person would get his or her own personal treatment that is tailored precisely to that person’s genetic make-up?

Venter: That was another one of these silly na├»ve notions that was out there. It’s not, ‘Oh, we know your genome, we’re going to make this drug for you.’ That will never happen. It is more important that you use the information in the genome about your personal risks and reduce them through intelligent behavior.
So when someone tells you "it's genetic", or "it's in your genes", it's kind of a fatalistic cop-out.  Yes, it is, but that doesn't mean you're without power to influence your genes.

As the author of the post below states:
"Our access to genetic information currently exceeds our understanding of what that information actually means."
Read the whole thing at Science-Based Medicine.